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Door , , 3 reacties
Bron: The Register

...zo zegt onze vriend Scott McNealy, CEO van Sun, in z'n speech op het IDC European IT Forum in Parijs. Hier heb je nog wat meer leuke uitlatingen van hem (wederom bruut gejat van The Register):

So far as who was in charge was concerned, it was the Web. Microsoft was trying to be in charge, McNealy quipped, but the rest of the world wanted open, multi-vendor systems. It was an HTML world, not one dominated by MS Word; Java and not Visual Basic; and browsers, not Windows. Of the $3 billion of venture capital distributed in Silicon Valley in the last quarter, McNealy didn't think any of it was for packaged software. Pure software and marketing organisations were doomed, McNealy thought: what was needed was "clicks and bricks" - with the bricks apparently being Sun's hardware, or content.

On the subject of nuclear power plants, McNealy was of the opinion that mere mortals should not be instructed how to operate them - and the same was true for PCs. After all, 40 per cent of AOL users only used AOL on their PCs, some 50 per cent of home PCs were languishing because the would-be users had forgotten how to use them - especially CTL-ALT-DEL. PCs were just too complex, the man from Sun said.

So far as software was concerned, most should be near-free he suggested, which gave him the cue to announce that in the first week and a half of Star being available free from Sun, there had been more than 250,000 downloads. One of the downloaders was McNealy's father-in-law, who had been using MS Office (which McNealy said was why he still called him "father-in-law"). Star was "just" 65Mb, though - alright for some with fibre access, but tough for others. A portal version of Star will be available in the next few months, McNealy said, adding that it was not necessary to have 40 million lines of code to run a browser. McNealy had a new joke about Linux: there were more people developing with it than the entire population of the state of Washington.

One of McNealy's envisaged uses for embedded devices was to give him control of any car driven by his son, so that it could be kept below 100 mph - and to know when his son had been downtown rather than in the library working, something he hoped would be recognised as great parenting rather than an invasion of privacy.

Questioned about the small number of thin clients (about a million in 1998) compared with PCs (perhaps 100 million), McNealy noted that "it takes as long to unravel a hairball as to ravel it, and Windows had been around for 20 years. It would still be some time before PCs were back in the hobby clubs again.

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Reacties (3)

G'liek heffuh.......
"...especially CTL-ALT-DEL. PCs were just too complex..."

das wel een hele brute manier om te verwijze naar NT <img src=http://192.87.219.67/~femme/wot/forum/interface/smilies/smile.gif width=15 height=15>
Wat lult ie nou allemaal. Laat hem eerst maar eens een desktop OS maken. En nee solaris is zeker niet complex. En als Sun zo stabiel is waarom lag ebay laatst 2x wel 24 uur plat. Die kerel lult alleen maar in zijn eigen straatje. Met zijn netwerk computer. Laat me niet lachen.

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